Yes Hotel Rome

Michelangelo, the Universal Artist at the Capitoline Museums in Rome

250px-Michelangelo-Buonarroti1On the occasion of the 450th anniversary of the death of Michelangelo Buonarroti the Capitoline Museums will organize an exhibition that, through some crucial themes of his poetry, offers an overview the life and work of this titan of art of all time. The exhibition is marked by a series of ‘opposing’ themes which intend to highlight the complexity of the design and execution of the works of this “universal artist.” In addition to the comparison of drawings, paintings, sculptures, architectural models, the project therefore provides an in-depth selection of autograph writings, including letters and rhymes.

 

Where: Capitoline Museums
When: Capitoline hill (Campidoglio), Rome.
How to get there: Subway station Colosseo (can be easily reached from Yes Hotel or Hotel Des Artistes using the B subway line.

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Pope Francis.

Francisco_20-03-20131.- As many of our guests have confirmed, wen he was a bishop in Argentina he used the public means of transportation to get around. He hasn’t tried to do the same in Rome but keep your eyes open if you visit the city!

2.- The man seriously challenges John Paul II as the coolest pope ever: To pay for his studies he worked as a nightclub bouncer in Buenos Aires.

3.- He is a rennaisance man: he studied chemistry, but is also a professor of literature and psychology.

4.- He is missing a part of his right lung. When he was young he got really sick and at the time antibiotic treatments weren’t that common so in such cases the tissue was removed to stop the infection from spreading.

5.- The motto he chose to put on his coat of arms when he became a bishop is taken from the homilies of the Venerable Bede: Miserando atque eligendo ( literally in Latin ‘by having mercy, by choosing him’.). As a pope, he has kept the phrase and the design, with some slight modifications.

 

Ara Pacis, the Altar of Peace in Rome

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The Ara Pacis (“Altar of Peace” in Latin) it’s not as popular as other Roman monuments, but deserves a spot in any itinerary.

The altar was a public homage, a monument to celebrate Augustus’ return from Hispania and Gaul (Spain and France) and to thank him for bringing peace with his military victories.

The altar is an outstanding example of Roman sculpture. All the figures are depictions of actual Roman citizens presented with such detail that historians believe they can recognize some of them.

Originally the altar was located near the Tiber, so it didn’t take long for it to be covered in mud. It was unearthed during the thirties and put in a pavillion than became inadecuate over time due to the increase of traffic and smog. A new building designed by American architect Richard Meier opened in 2006. The new structure includes a museum, but the altar itself, surrounded by glass walls through wich you can see the Tiber it’s something you have to experience while in Rome.

The Ara Pacis is located in Lungotevere in Augusta (corner with via Tomacelli) and can be easily reached from Yes Hotel or Hotel Des Artistes taking the red subway line from the Station Termini and getting off at Flaminio.

A Stroll Down Via del Boschetto

5901149111_3a046017da_zWhen it comes to eating in Rome there are many places where the guides and even locals will usually direct you: Trastevere, San Lorenzo and recently Pignetto. But there’s a place ( a couple of streets) not that famous that I would like to introduce you to.

Via del Boschetto and Via Dei Serpenti are located just off Via Nazionale (the big avenue that starts on Repubblica square, just beside Termini). The area is right in the center of the City, but is quiet and the atmosphere is easygoing. During the evenings you can see people sitting beside a fountain, having a beer, just like the more radical crowd do in San Lorenzo.

There are many places to eat and even some pleasant surprises: a takeaway Sushi place, a Japanese restaurant and a couple of Indian restaurants. If what you are after is Italian food you can try Osteria al 16, on Via del Boschetto 16. I have been there with friends a couple of times and I have never been disappointed. If like me, you enjoy a hearty meal, you will appreciate the spaghetti all’amatriciana (spaghetti with tomato sauce and bacon) and the meatballs with tomato sauce.

boschettoThe best is that this area is just a blocks away from the Colosseum, so if you are in the mood you can walk over there to put a perfect ending to your Roman serata.

And don’t forget to send me a line to tell me about your adventure, and to check our websites to get the best deals for accommodation in the best Hotels in Rome!

4 New Subway Stations in Rome

After many delays, the extension of the B subway line was inaugurated last year.

Users weren’t exactly ecstatic about the new service, with initial delays of more than 8 minutes, but this new addition is welcome in a city whose subway line is rather small considering the dimensions of the urban area.

For people visiting Rome the main good news is that the new extension, called B1, will allow them to visit more easily the Catacombs of Santa Agnese. Before, the place could only be reached after a long bus ride from the station Termini. Now, people staying near the station Termini (in hotels like Des Artistes or Yes Hotel) will be only 10 minutes away from the catacombs taking the B subway line at Castro Pretorio or Termini and then getting off at the station Annibaliano.

Currently 2 other lines (C and D) are in the works, but don’t hold your breath: the small B1 extension took more than 7 years to be finished.

Here you have an updated map of the Roman subway including the 4 new stations Annibaliano, Libia/Gonda, Conca D’oro and Jonio :


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Rome Close-Up: The Ace of Cups of the Trevi Fountain


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We’re inaugurating a new section, Roman Close-up. Here’ we’ll try to show you the story behind some details of the city.

The Trevi Fountain is a baroque explosion of stone, muscles and sea-horses. There are enough details on it to write entire books, but there is a specific part of the sculpture around which a little local legend has been created.

The story goes that during the construction of the fountain an overly critical barber who  worked accross the street used to overwhelm Nicola Salvi, the sculptor, with his suggestions and (usually negative) observations about the artist’s work. Understandably annoyed, Salvati proceded then to add to the fountain a vase strategically located to block the view of the fountain from the barbershop to put and end to

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the unrequested artisical feedback.

The story doesn’t mention if a vase was enough to deter the artistically overzealous barber (maybe he was more into classicism– I cannot help but wonder how that reflected in his work), but the tale is popular among Romans, who call the vase “l’asso di coppe”, the ace of cups, after a figure in the Italian deck of cards.

Stayed tune for more Roman close-ups, and don’t forget to check our websites to find the best accomodation in the Eternal City!


Rome Meets The World 2013


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Rome Meets The World is already a summer tradition in the city. The aim of the festival is to bring to Roman audiciences some of the best performers from the most diverse musical scenes. These are our picks for this year’s edition:

June 15, 2013
COCOROSIE
The music they played has been labeled “freak folk”. It’s an accurate description.

June18, 2013
MODENA CITY RAMBLERS
The Ramblers and their folk sound are an institution in Italy.

July 14, 2013
NINA ZILLI & FABRIZIO BOSSO
She has a big bluesy voice and the looks of Zadie Smith; he seems ready to join Enrico Rava and Paolo Fresu in the olympus of great Italian trumpet players.

July 18, 2013
MALIKA AYANE
An Italian singer of Maroccan descent and one of the most interesting figures in the local pop scene.

July 19, 2013
ORCHESTRA DI PIAZZA VITTORIO
A multicultural Roman phenomenon whose story is worth spreading.

July 23, 2013
ELIO E LE STORIE TESE
The revered irreverent of Italy’s music scene.

The concerts take place at Villa Ada (Via Salaria 275) which can be reached from the Termini Station, just a few minutes away from Yes Hotel and Hotel Des Artistes with the bus 92. To read the full program, click here.

The Most Roman of Romans


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It has always puzzled me that many people know about Rome and its greatness but so little is known about Romans. Compared to the Londoner or the Parisian, the Roman remains a mystery, probably because like his food, he is hearty but not sophisticated, shrewd but not always insightful.

Romanity, however, captivates those who get to get to know it. If you want to get a glimpse of it without having to stay a couple of years in the Eternal City then you have to read the sonnets of Gioachino Belli, who is in my book the most Roman of Romans.

Belli was born to a weatlhy family and earned a place in the Italian literary cannon with 2200 sonnets through which the low Roman class of the time its shown as it is, “salacious, sometimes cunning and always self-centerd” as the ruthless Italian Wikipedia article about Belli puts it.

The most striking feature of the sonnets is also the reason why they are not as known as they should: they are written in the Romanesco dialect which gives them a poignantly accurate flavor when read in Italian but also eludes translation. An English version of the sonnets its available at the Anglo-American Bookstore, my bookstore of choice in Rome or online, from this website where you will find gems like this:

PIAZZA NAVONA

Piazza Navona easily stands the comparison
With both St.Peter’s and the Spanish Steps.
This is not a square, it’s like the countryside,
It’s a theatre, it’s a fair, it’s gaiety.
.
It runs from Sant’Apollinare 2 to the central pathway,
And from the central pathway to Cuccagna street 3:
Everywhere you see things to eat,
Everywhere you see people who buy them.
.
Here three fountains stand in all their might,
Here is a spire 4, as solemn as a judgement,
Here the place is flooded when summertime comes .
.
Here the whipping-trestle is raised,
Where those who look for trouble get thirty lashes
On their arse, and five more for charity .

Rome gets ready to enjoy a hot latin summer

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Words are funny. Take the word “latino”, by example. The term is used today to denote people of latin american descent, but originally it was the name given to the inhabitants of Latium, the region where Rome is located.

So we can say that the festival Soylatino is a comeback of sorts.From June through September Ostia, the beach located just outside Rome, will turn tropical with latin american music and food.

Wednesday the fee is 8 euros Wednesday and Thursday, 10 Euros Friday and  12 Euros Saturday.The entrance is free on Sundays and every day from 19:00 to 21:00 PM.To reach the festival using the public transportation system from Hotel Des Artistes or Yes Hotel, take the blue subway line until Piramide and from there take the train going to Ostia and get off at the station Lidio di Ostia.

Rome Celebrates Machiavelli’s “The Prince”


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Machiavelli is an Italian icon. His shrewdness, pragmatism and fascination with power are all trademarks of the Italian temperament. With his elucidations about power and the means to preserve it he created almost single-handedly what we know as political science, securing himself a place in history and beside the beds of many leaders (Napolean among them)  who have turned to him for guidance.

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Even though Machiavelli’s name is almost universally associated with coldness and power-for.the-sake-of-power, there is much more to him than that and he has been object of an operation of rehabilitation in Italy. As a part of said operation an exhibition has just been opened at the Complesso del Vittoriano to celebrate the 500th anniversay of The Prince, Macchiaveli’s most famous work.

Visitors will be able to see on display one of the 19 known original manuscripts of the book and learn more about the Machiavelli’s relationshipo with both classic culture and contemporary popular culture. The Complesso del Vittoriano is located at Via San Pietro in Carcere, right beside Piazza Venezia. The exhibition is open everyday from 9.30 to 19.30 (until Jully 16, 2013) and the entrance is free.